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FDA Warns Of Dangers To Young Children From Swallowing Eyedrops, Nasal Decongestants.

 

The Los Angeles Times   (10/26, Maugh) "Science Now" blog reports that on Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration "warned parents and pediatricians about the dangers of swallowing over-the-counter eyedrops and nasal decongestants by children age five and younger." According to the article, "the agency cited 96 cases of serious illness resulting from accidental swallowing of the products, with 53 hospitalizations." There have been no deaths reported. The Times says that "when the products are ingested by young children, even at levels as small as 1 or 2 milliliters (5 milliliters are in a teaspoon) they can cause serious or even life-threatening side effects."

        MedPage Today  (10/26) reports that "the agency noted that, although no deaths have been reported, 53 patients required hospitalization for symptoms including nausea, vomiting, lethargy, tachycardia, decreased respiration, bradycardia, hypotension, hypertension, sedation, somnolence, mydriasis, stupor, hypothermia, drooling, and coma with amounts as little as 1 to 2 mL." According to the article, the FDA said in a statement that "most over-the-counter nasal decongestants and anti-redness eye drops are not packaged with childproof closures." In light of this, "parents should store such products out of reach of children."

        WebMD  (10/26, DeNoon) reports that the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) "has proposed a new rule requiring child-resistant packaging for these products," but the "rule has yet to be finalized."

 

The Los Angeles Times Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/26, Maugh) "Science Now" blog reports that on Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration "warned parents and pediatricians about the dangers of swallowing over-the-counter eyedrops and nasal decongestants by children age five and younger." According to the article, "the agency cited 96 cases of serious illness resulting from accidental swallowing of the products, with 53 hospitalizations." There have been no deaths reported. The Times says that "when the products are ingested by young children, even at levels as small as 1 or 2 milliliters (5 milliliters are in a teaspoon) they can cause serious or even life-threatening side effects."

        MedPage Today Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/26) reports that "the agency noted that, although no deaths have been reported, 53 patients required hospitalization for symptoms including nausea, vomiting, lethargy, tachycardia, decreased respiration, bradycardia, hypotension, hypertension, sedation, somnolence, mydriasis, stupor, hypothermia, drooling, and coma with amounts as little as 1 to 2 mL." According to the article, the FDA said in a statement that "most over-the-counter nasal decongestants and anti-redness eye drops are not packaged with childproof closures." In light of this, "parents should store such products out of reach of children."

        WebMD Share to FacebookShare to Twitter (10/26, DeNoon) reports that the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) "has proposed a new rule requiring child-resistant packaging for these products," but the "rule has yet to be finalized."

 

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